Fall Vegetables

January 05, 2021  •  Leave a Comment

I had never before planted a fall vegetable garden before because the time when it needs to be planted, August, has always been too hot and dry. In August the ground is usually hard and my rain barrels are empty. But this year it wasn't. The heat came early, in July, and August was fairly wet. So I thought I'd give a fall garden a try. I was encouraged by watching a recorded lecture on the UGA Agriculture Extension Service website by a small commercial farmer. It was a great presentation. It answered so many questions. So, inspired, I ordered seeds online. Unfortunately that was right in the middle of the Post Office scandal. The heretofore reliable USPS was dismantling letter sorters, laying off workers, and deliberately slowing down service in preparation for the expected increase in mail in general election ballots due to the Coronavirus pandemic. Good plan, right? I tracked my seeds from Pennsylvania to Atlanta to Athens in just three days. Then inexplicably, they took a side trip to Chattanooga, had a layover there and finally got back on the road again to Atlanta eventually arriving in Athens a week late. Now, fall planting time is critical because seeds have to get in the ground in time for the plants to mature before the first frost which is typically early November. I complained to my Congress people with a copy of my tracking data. Over the months I cajoled and chastised, fed and weeded the plants until eventually some of them produced. Not all, but that's gardening for you. The root plants had some trouble getting going. When I tested my soil I noticed that the ph was fine and seemed to have sufficient nitrogen but the potasium was non existent. With a little quick Web research I figured that was the problem so I ordered some potasium and dug it in around the veggies. That did the trick. I'd never been very successful with carrots before but figured my soil wasn't sandy enough although it has great texture. But it was potasium that they needed. Same with the turnips and radishes. Although kohlrabi isn't a bulb it is kind of like a bulb that grows on top of the ground. See my homepage slideshow for some photos of my produce: turnips, radishes, carrots and kohlrabi. The Pok Choi haven't yet reached a size worth harvesting. But I have been enjoying making soups and casseroles with these and still have quite a few still in the ground and in storage in my garage.

 


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